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The Emotional Differences between Mastectomy and Lumpectomy, Chemotherapy and Radiation

Posted by: Tracy Johnson on Aug 28, 2014 in Surgery, Treatment

The physical differences between a mastectomy and lumpectomy can be easily comprehended. The different physical side effects between chemotherapy and radiation therapy are well documented and information of those differences is readily available for patients.

But what about the emotional differences between a lumpectomy and mastectomy or the mental effects with chemotherapy and radiation? Or is there a difference at all?

Is Breast Conservation an Option for Breast Cancer Surgery?

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 27, 2014 in Surgery

Depending on the size and stage of the breast cancer, among other factors, many cancer patients choose to have breast conservation, or breast-sparing, surgery.

This procedure is designed to remove the cancer and some breast tissue surrounding the mass, but leave as much breast tissue intact as possible. Doctors may also remove lymph nodes from under the arm to test whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

CANCER Q&A: What Is a Cancer Genome?

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 25, 2014 in Genetics

The following information is provided by the Cancer Services of Greater Baton Rouge and was published by The Advocate.

QUESTION: What is a cancer genome?

ANSWER: According to the National Cancer Institute, a genome is the complete genetic material of a living organism. Packaged sets of chromosomes that make up the genes of a cell make up a genome.

Four Healthy Grilling Tips to Use on the Pit

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 21, 2014 in Nutrition

The following post was written by Amber McGuerty with Woman’s Nutrition Services Department.

481053955 (1)Summer is beginning to wind down, but it’s not time to stow away the barbecue pits just yet.

You can cook almost anything on the grill and it can be a healthy way of preparing meals if done properly.

Managing Your Change of Smell During Treatment

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 20, 2014 in Nutrition, Treatment

The following post is written by Paula Meeks, registered dietitian with Woman’s Hospital.

In addition to a change in taste, a lot of patients going through cancer treatment also experience a change in their sense of smell. Because smell is a large factor with how appetizing certain foods can be, this change largely affects patients’ appetite and their reactions to food.

Also like the change in taste, there is no method to prevent these changes. These side effects generally go away once treatment stops, but in the meantime, there are steps a patient can take to help her manager her sense of smell and keep it from affecting her desire for food.

Cancer Q&A: The Relationship Between Obesity and Cancer

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 18, 2014 in Diagnosis

The following information is provided by the Cancer Services of Greater Baton Rouge and was published by The Advocate.

QUESTION: Is there any link between obesity and cancer?

ANSWER: Research suggests that certain lifestyle behaviors and being overweight or obese may contribute to around 20 or 30 percent of cancers in America today.

Letting Your Emotions Out

The following post was written by Robin Maggio, cancer navigator at Woman’s Hospital. 

Just as each cancer diagnosis is different, each person’s reaction and emotions upon receiving a diagnosis are unique to that individual. There are a host of different feelings that come with finding out you have cancer, many of them negative but somewhat surprisingly, some can be positive.

One of the most common emotional reactions I see from people just diagnosed with cancer is fear. Fear over what the diagnosis means for their future — “How far has the cancer progressed? Will I need treatment? How will the treatment affect me? Will I still be able to work or go to school or take care of my family?” That fear can lead to worry and stress about their future — “Who is going to take care of me? Who is going to take care of my children and my family?”

What is Lymphedema?

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 13, 2014 in Treatment

The following post includes information from Chalisse Labauve, Lymphedema Therapist at Woman’s Center for Wellness.

The problems associated with cancer don’t stop after surgery to remove the growth. Unfortunately, in many cases, after surgery is when many side effects begin.

One such side effect of cancer surgery and cancer treatment is lymphedema, a swelling under the skin near the surgery location. Many breast cancer patients develop lymphedema swelling under the arm.

Taylor Swift Brightens Cancer Patient with Surprise Concert

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 11, 2014 in Support, Treatment

One cancer patient got the surprise of a lifetime when one of music’s biggest name surprised him with an impromptu concert at the hospital.

Six-year-old Jordan Lee Nickerson is battling leukemia and is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatment at Boston Children’s Hospital, but for one day last week, Nickerson was all smiles when he was visited by his favorite musician: Taylor Swift.

Back-to-School Stress Busters for Parents

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Aug 07, 2014 in Emotions

For many children in Baton Rouge, August 11 marks the first day of school. While you may be looking forward to having the kids out of the house and back to a structured routine, there’s a lot to do before that first day.

As families get ready for school, parents can be overwhelmed by the pressure that comes from getting school supplies, buying new clothes and making plans, as well as the daily work and household responsibilities. And if you’re going through cancer treatment or helping a friend or family member with their treatment, your stress level is already high enough. But back to school doesn’t have to mean back to the crazy life.

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