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Finding Love – and Relaxation – This Valentine’s Day

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Feb 11, 2016 in Emotions, Support

heartWho needs another box of chocolates? Valentine’s Day is meant to be an opportunity to show your love, and Cupid’s arrow shouldn’t mean stressing out about flowers, chocolate and a romantic restaurant dinner.

For those going through cancer treatment or caregivers of cancer patients, pampering goes a long way.

Happy Mardi Gras!

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Feb 09, 2016 in Uncategorized

Cancer Q&A: Are Support Groups Good For Everyone Dealing With Cancer?

The following information is provided by the Cancer Services of Greater Baton Rouge and was published by The Advocate.

Research shows that involvement in support groups can help improve a cancer patient’s quality of life as well as his or her perception of pain and mood. The structured environment of a support group allows for meaningful discussion that is therapeutic for cancer patients.

While undergoing cancer treatment, it is important to deal with both the emotional and physical effects of treatment.

Throw Me Something Healthy, Mister: A Low-Fat King Cake for Carnival Season

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Feb 04, 2016 in Nutrition

Mardi GrasWith Mardi Gras right around the corner, it’s time to stock up on beads, mark your parade routes and pull your purple, green and gold wardrobe out of the closet. But what Mardi Gras would be complete without Louisiana’s sweetest holiday treat – a king cake?

While the high-sugar, high-carb, high-calorie and high-just about everything king cakes found in area bakeries can leave your diet with a hangover the following Wednesday, there are healthier options so you can have your king cake and eat it, too.

Cancer Q&A: What is Chemo Brain?

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Feb 03, 2016 in Diagnosis, Treatment

The following information is provided by the Cancer Services of Greater Baton Rouge and was published by The Advocate.

Chemo brain is the common name given to a group of side effects cancer patients experience during or after chemo. Some patients receiving other types of treatment often experience these side effects; so the name is not entirely accurate and may also be referred to as “cognitive dysfunction.”

An Emotional Journey

Posted by: Tracy Johnson on Feb 01, 2016 in Emotions

For every patient, there is always an emotional toll they must go through during their cancer fight.

There are ups and downs and everything else in between before and after surgery and before, during and after treatment.

Like grief, there are different stages cancer patients go through. The stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and, finally, acceptance. Those stages are also prevalent in many cancer patients.

Depression is a common emotion that I see with patients, and it can happen at any time. Before surgery, during treatment and even months or years after treatment is over, it is not uncommon to see patients struggling with what is happening to their body.

What to Eat During Cancer Treatment: Creamy mac and cheese

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Jan 28, 2016 in Nutrition, Treatment

Cancer treatments are designed to kill cancer cells. But these treatments can also damage healthy cells. Damage to healthy cells can cause side effects, and some of these side effects can lead to eating problems such as appetite loss, changes in taste or smell, nausea and weight loss.

Because of these side effects, many patients undergoing cancer treatment adjust their diets and cooking habits. The American Cancer Society, as well as numerous cancer institutes, chefs and culinary resources, have adapted favorite recipes to meet the needs of cancer patients undergoing treatment.

Cancer Q&A: Cancer and Anemia

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Jan 27, 2016 in Diagnosis, Treatment

The following information is provided by the Cancer Services of Greater Baton Rouge and was published by The Advocate.

QUESTION: I am a cancer patient and my doctor says we need to be vigilant about anemia. Why?

ANSWER: Anemia is a condition in which the body lacks a sufficient number of red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body’s tissues.

Because tissues cannot function normally with this lack of oxygen, symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath greatly affect not only the quality of life, but cancer treatment as well.

Avoid Getting Sick from the Foods You Eat

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Jan 25, 2016 in Nutrition

The following post is written by Paula Meeks, registered dietitian with Woman’s Hospital.

Food safety is an important consideration for everyone. Whether you’re undergoing cancer treatment or healthy, avoiding tainted and expired foods is critical to maintaining your health.

But some cancer treatments can make you more likely to get infections, so avoiding infection from foods is especially important for treatment patients. When this happens, you need to take special care in the way you handle and prepare food.

Finding Your Serenity after Diagnosis

Posted by: Living With Cancer Guest Blogger on Jan 21, 2016 in Diagnosis, Emotions

The following post is written by the Rev. Lisa Baumgartner, chaplain with Woman’s Hospital.

After a cancer diagnosis, many patients go through the five stages of grief before they can accept the fact that they have cancer. Those stages include denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.

For many, turning to their religion and spirituality can be a helpful method to dealing with their emotions following the diagnosis.

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